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William Shakespeare and the art of plagiarism

Course: Weekly lessons, Unit: Science, technology, and environment

  • 75 mins
  • In class
  • Reading
  • B2, C1


Learning goals:

  • Understand and respond to an article about Shakespeare and plagiarism
  • Use a variety of reading strategies

Published by

EF Education First


Success criteria:

  • Correctly answer questions on an article about Shakespeare and plagiarism
  • Demonstrate understanding of the meaning and use of key vocabulary from the article
  • Create definitions for phrases attributed to Shakespeare, and persuade other students they are true

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Activities (11)

Introduction

Introduction

Recommendations

  • 2 mins
  • Class
  • Core activity


Student instructions

No instructions


Teacher notes

No teacher notes

 

A Shakespeare short

A Shakespeare short

Recommendations

  • 5 mins
  • Pair, Group, Class
  • Core activity


Student instructions

Watch the video and answer the questions:

• What do you think happens in Julius Caesar?

• What influence has Shakespeare had on our culture?

• Where might Shakespeare have got his ideas from?


Teacher notes

The aim of this activity is to engage students with the topic of Shakespeare and one of his plays, Julius Caesar.

Have students watch the video, twice if necessary, and work in pairs or groups to reconstruct the plot of Julius Caesar. Encourage students to infer and be creative. It doesn't matter if they have understood everything in the video. Then compare different versions in the class and decide which is the most accurate, and which is the most entertaining.

 

Borrowing from the Bard

Borrowing from the Bard

Recommendations

  • 5 mins
  • Individual, Pair, Class
  • Core activity


Student instructions

Elements of Shakespeare's work can be seen in many modern movies and TV series. Match the movies and TV series to the description of each Shakespeare play. There are two answers for each play.


Teacher notes

The aim of this activity is to relate Shakespeare's work to recent movies and TV series.

 

Originality in stories

Originality in stories

Recommendations

  • 4 mins
  • Pair, Group, Class
  • Core activity


Student instructions

Discuss the questions about the importance of originality


Teacher notes

The aim of this activity is to encourage students to think further about the topic of originality in preparation for reading an article about Shakespeare and plagiarism.

 

Getting the gist

Getting the gist

Recommendations

  • 5 mins
  • Individual, Pair, Class
  • Core activity


Student instructions

Skim the article about Shakespeare and plagiarism, and answer the questions.


Teacher notes

The aim of this activity is to skim an article about Shakespeare and plagiarism to understand its main ideas.

If necessary, to clarify the theme and key vocabulary beforehand, have students read the headline and try to paraphrase it. Give feedback with reference to the Language notes.

 

Vocabulary: Study

Vocabulary: Study

Recommendations

  • 5 mins
  • Individual, Pair, Class
  • Core activity


Student instructions

Study the vocabulary in bold in the article. Then match the correct definition to each word or phrase. You do not need to use all the words.


Teacher notes

The aim of this activity is to study the meaning of key vocabulary from the article.

This prepares students for the detail questions in Who said what?

 

Vocabulary: Practice

Vocabulary: Practice

Recommendations

  • 6 mins
  • Individual, Pair, Class
  • Support activity


Student instructions

Read the text about plagiarism and complete it with the key language. You will need to change the form of some of the words.


Teacher notes

The aim of this activity is to practise the use of key vocabulary from the article.

Extension

 

Who said what?

Who said what?

Recommendations

  • 11 mins
  • Individual, Pair, Class
  • Core activity


Student instructions

Read the article again and match the statements to the people who made them. You do not need to use all of the statements.


Teacher notes

The aim of this activity is to scan the article to identify which people in the article said specific things. Students may consult the reference material on scanning if they wish.

 

Respond

Respond

Recommendations

  • 7 mins
  • Pair, Group, Class
  • Core activity


Student instructions

Think about plagiarism and discuss the questions about it.


Teacher notes

The aim of this activity is to further explore the ideas from the article and relate them to students' experiences and opinions.

Following the discussion, have each group or pair report to the class on one interesting comment that was made.

 

Call my bluff

Call my bluff

Recommendations

  • 20 mins
  • Group, Class
  • Challenge activity


Student instructions

Play a guessing game.


Teacher notes

The aim of this activity is to develop communicative skills through a game in which students try to persuade each other of the correct definition of some of Shakespeare's phrases.

To begin the activity, tell students that you want to teach them to speak like Shakespeare, and that there's method in your madness. Give three possible choices as to what this phrase means. For example:

 

Exit ticket

Exit ticket

Recommendations

  • 5 mins
  • Individual, Pair
  • Core activity


Student instructions

Answer the questions and then discuss them with a partner.


Teacher notes

The aim of this activity is for students to reflect on what they learned and what they didn't understand in the lesson, and discuss this with a partner.

 
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